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of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> before brown versus board of education, there was another directive by harry s. truman which banned diskrcrimination o anyone in the military regard l regardless of race, creed or religious beliefs. it with was a historical truth that the u.s. military described as an engine of war by progressives has been a leading institution for fight for racial equality, and because the military leaders carry great weight with many americans, i thought i would remind one american in particular just where the military stands on a decision he will be making very soon. my letter this week is to supreme court chief justice john roberts as he considers a challenge to the affirmative action program at the university of texas. dear chief justice roberts, it is me, e melissa. remember last june you were the deciding vote to uphold the affordable health care act, yeah? well, that was a cool way to ensure the legacy and in truth, it gave me faith that despite your ideologically derived positions and the willingness to overturn established preced
on and that is educational. the lathe operator now replaced by a machine . the guy who operates that is a guy with computer knowledge. we are not educating our work force to support the kind of tech lodgical economy that we are going through. >> johnathon a new high in the stock market makes us take our eye off of the ball on unemployment. >> i am glad to see the market up, eric. but president obama's recovery is worst in moderp history . i think wayne's point all of the entitlements that we built up. that intervention prolongs the crisis and worsens the crisis. a lot of the countries that have systemic unemployment. france never had that low since the 1980s. bigger government grows and bigger medockity grows. >> if things are so good out of washington d.c. and hear it out of the obama administration on the recovery. how come 47 million americans are on food stamps and the number that we spend on food stamps tripled under obama's watch? >> look, i agree with you. there is no recovery that we can measure here and you can point to how many people are out of work and lost their homes and on food stamps. we ne
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
health care, not talking about education, but you are showing the two guns, because you're trying to solidify to those voters who vote based upon guns, that to me is crazy. and so if you're going to get criticized, you're going to praise guns, you're going to get criticized. so, look, i understand that -- >> but just because someone says that guns are okay does not mean that they are advocating mass shootings like in newtown. >> look -- >> that's aggressive. that's bullying and far worse, some might say. >> last i checked, politics is a rough and tumble business. and i have seen far worse when it comes to commercials. but, again, the point you're making is, when you have a commercial and you want to tout guns on one hand, expect the opposite reaction on the other. >> rohan, i have to say, if that ad is okay, maybe using -- i mean, the other ads that the nra ran that were offensive about the president's children, all these ads seem to be problematic. >> i find that ad really infuriating for this reason. we have some deep, deep problems that drive crime and violence in this society.
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
liberal education system as well as a very liberal media in general. my expectation with kids coming out of high school or college this sort of seem to think the government just passed the money and gives it out. if they don't seem to realize until much later in life that they're taking my money and giving it out. so i think it's an educational problem, much deeper than whether a candidate is running in a particular town. thanks for c-span. host: peter, thanks for the call. guest: conservatives have a lot of work to do in the media and in education. the media situation is a lot more balanced than 20 years ago or 30 years ago. a couple of major newspapers and magazines have collapsed. young people can access a ton of points of view and a lot of data and information and that is a healthy thing. people complain about the internet and all of these blogs and what happened to the good old days when you had serious editors manning the phones? i think the current situation is much healthier for a vigorous democracy and there's a lot of good stuff out there. if we have a piece on our website, a w
vs. board of education decision killing of civil-rights workers, the young high-school student who led a walkout to protest against fifth inferior education. 1951. many people we don't even know there names or other teenagers who did the same thing. so the resistance largely among young people. >> definitely when you talk about south africa, we all remember nelson mandela who was in a prison cell. for others to revived a movement in the early '70s and the late '60s. >> host: talking about children, james did something that got a lot of criticism for him and dr. king. >> guest: king was at a crucial point* in birmingham with millions of people across the country followed him. from montgomery which king did not initiate, through birmingham, king is a leader in search of a following. only in birmingham can he initiate and sustain a movement the dow reached a crucial point* in 1963 all those who were adults who were willing to get arrested already had been arrested. he writes his letter from the birmingham jail. it was not clear he bush win in birmingham. if he lost there would be no m
concerned about, people are concerned about health care costs and education costs. and to a lesser extent, when economic growth is stronger as it was later in the bush years maybe they're concerned about issues related to the bottom and so. education and health care and sort of the broader challenge of globalization, those things loom incredibly large and the republican imagination and those are not issues republicans like to talk about. this is where compassion conservatism didn't emerge any backing to emerge in the late 1990s from a period when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington for four, six years. and the whole point of bush's him was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. that's something to say about health care. you can go back and said, i think justifiably, that something like the prescription drugs bill was too big, cost too much, should've bee been paid fn someone been paid for and so wanted you to make similar critiques with no child left behind by the republican party will never get back to the wilderness if it ju
if it is not the guns. >> i think we don't talk enough about the education and economic opportunities that these young people do not have. many of these young people who are involved in these type of activities are locked in two three, four, and five generations of poverty. we're locked in without opportunities often sometimes facing food desert. everything from finding good healthy food to eat, good jobs and educational opportunities and having a life, these things are locked away from these individuals and have been for decades now. i genuinely believe we can cut down on the gun violence in chicago and clang that paradigm. and then from there go after those who are illegally using guns. >> cenk: you know, lenny, i don't think anybody disagrees with you that addressing those issues is a good idea. i think it is. but you heard what profession pollock said there is as much crime in western european cities. they don't have the guns so less people die. in chicago here 500 people killed by guns. in japan on average less than 10 people killed by guns and japan is 125 million people in it. 10 people killed
with the municipality department of department of building inspection and also for ongoing outreach education, helping businesses in compliance with their construction-related accessibility improvements. of the dollar, $0.70 is to stay in the local municipality. $0.30 goes to the state. 5% of that $0.70 goes to administering and processing of collecting the dollar and the rest of the 65% comes back to working on inspectors and helping get inspectors become inspectors with the department of building inspection and our outreach education ongoing and helping businesses comply with the construction-related accessibility requirements. so dbi and i have started a conversation just about how we're going to be constructing working with the funds. obviously right now there is not going to be much money. we'll probably see what after may, when the business registration is due from businesses just how much the allotment will be there. and how much annually we'll be able to work with. maximum probably -- it's probably going to be in the $65,000 range per year, with the average of about 80,000 registered busine
young people make it through, um, you know, their educational goals, college or graduate school, in light of runaway tuition. >> yes. >> is that right? okay. do you want -- >> and also -- [inaudible] >> right. >> i mean, how are we going to get the doctors if tuition is 70 grand a year? >> we write in the booking about how -- in the book about how hard it is for homeless kids in the cities in which they live today just get through high school. the challenge that so many kids confront, and liz murray wrote, you know, a beautiful memoir, "breaking night," about her journey from homelessness to harvard, how are we going to create opportunities for kids whose families won't or can't take care of them who have been told over and over again you're broken because they're poor or their parents hate them or reject them because they're gay or lesbian. these kids feel so damaged that college feels like another planet to them. and we write in the book about the game changing things that cities and nonprofits are doing to create high schools that are connected to homeless youth centers. ther
to try to educate our youth about the responsibility of using a firearm, the dangers of using a firearm? >> yeah. in a true way, to educate young people about both the responsibility and the true dangers, that's not a bad thing. what is a bad thing is blatantly marketing these guns to young people. basically it exposes the true colors of the gun lobby. they're not concerned in the gun industry. they're not concerned about the prevention of gun violence. they're just concerned about selling more guns. the rest of the american public wants to engage in a meaningful conversation about exactly what you're saying. what we can do respectful of the second amendment right to own guns, respectful of the fact that hunting and target shooting and protection are deeply ingrained notions. and, you know, in a lot of our country. but have that conversation simultaneous to the risks associated with having guns in the home and what we can do to prevent tragedies. >> sure. the tragedy that is most fresh on everyone's mind, newtown. right now there's a hearing under way in connecticut about stopping gun v
school district meeting tonight. it starts in an hour. parents are outraged that a special education teacher who abused a child is still employed. cbs 5 reporter da lin spoke with the child's mother. da. >> reporter: that's right, ann. the mother and a lot of parents in this district are disappointed that the district did not fire that teacher and already even though the meeting is in an hour, there are already parents sitting here waiting for the doors to open. this is the agenda right here. the meeting will be held in that room behind those doors in about an hour. the superintendent and the district's attorney will be here to answer those questions, why they did not fire that teacher. lawyers questioned special ed. teacher gina holt in the video about whether she dragged a special needs student out of his chair and kicked him. >> i asked him about it. told me that it had happened at school. >> reporter: holt denied abusing the 5-year-old boy in 2010. yet she pleaded no contest to a count of misdemeanor child abuse. despite the conviction and a
to the state of new jersey if they were to reach certain goals on -- for schools. >> education. >> education grants to the state of new jersey and they hit it, $200 million from zuckerberg and $200 million from a matching grant why would liberals not want more of that. >> the reason they pulled it back, they don't want to get him mad. he gives a lot of money to democrats and the stupid thing to do is attack him for doing the fundraiser. >> in the old days you'd call up an yell at them. >> we used to put fire things in the garbage... >> do you want to talk about intolerantly liberals, mark zuckerberg or bobby jindal. >> i want to talk about everything. my theory is the left, holds an axe over the right's head or farr their friends hope to right. it is social acceptance, if you want to go to the right parties, new york city and california and want to be accepted, and avoid ridicule, be like us, it is a form of social bullying and america accepted it because we see cool trumps character and liberals are more intolerant because they have a louder megaphone and, people like me are knuckle-draggin
. >> oh sure. it's laughable. it's absurd. this is an extraordinaryily smart, well-educated man. they lead the nation's largest archdiocese, and these are shrewd people. they think long and hard about clever ways to protect the predators and enup endanger kids. even a teenager, even a high school drop out knows if you suspect a crime you call the police. that's especially true if you know about the crime. it's especially true if the victims are children. it's especially true if the crime is likely to be repeated. cardinal mahony knows this. he's a social worker by training and background, for heaven's sake. there is nothing naive about the men who hid these crimes for decades. >> john: these people who came forward, i won't call them victims but survivors we've seen pay-outs by the church, do you think this deception and secrecy is still a part of the church's culture today? >> i have to say sadly it very much is. i know that's hard for people to understand but it's crucial to remember, john, that this is a monarchy. as much as this scandal has tarnished the hierarchy the men at the top of
? highway system. transportation system. public education system. goes back to the articles of confederation. states will make that kind of decision. not everyone has the permanent me an basin that texas has to fund its education system. there will be some give-and-take. melissa: that is the flip side. states down the road do away with taxes, does the state fall apart? >> we independent fall apart. we had to figure out a way to pay for the highway patrol. i think that states are searching for a balance. i think, good thing that can come out of this budget debate, both the state level and local level, what really can government do constructively and how much are we willing to pay to have them do it. melissa: yeah. >> deal with the past pension problems that are a big part of the state is the money they didn't spend in the past because they promised to spend in the future. big problem. states will have to figure out how to deal with that locality. this is a healthy debate i think. melissa: dave, give you the last word. do you agree with that? >> i do agree with that. i think the opportunity is
will do it in health care, education and energy. think about that. health care is one sixth of the economy. energy, you control the production and the pricing and control everything from he tried to with capt. trade and he tried. education is the future. you control those three elements and you have what lenin would call the commanding height of a post industrial society. that is what he said he wanted to do. in fact, you don't remember this because, unlike me, you have real lives for it you don't have to watch everything the man says. i do for my sins and they clearly are mending. [laughter] but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase -- the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered. but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech was called "the new foundation." he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appellation, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ideologically ambitious he was from day
at the university of michigan. what it is is a response to, you know, a lot of new education options that are out there online and many of them are free, but, you go and take a course in history at one place, another one on writing and spanish at other places, what do you do with all the classes, especially since a lot of the other universities online they don't offer degrees. under this wisconsin university flexible option program, what students can do is earn a degree by passing a series of tests without ever stepping foot on the campus. now, you may need to take a few classes to get up to speed, but it offers students a ton of flexibility, it could really be a sign of where education is headed. you know, testing your way to a bachelor's degree. >> a lot of people go in their freshman year and say it makes sense. if i could take the test without going to the class. has the university determined how much this program will cost? >> reporter: not yet. but we're going to get more details when this thing goes online in the fall. >> okay. so i want to talk about something serious now. we should proba
is undecided about her pregnancy, she's educated about all the options available to her. the knowledge that a pregnancy center can provide her, with the help she needs during pregnancy and after she needs the baby -- she has the baby, often makes the difference between life and death of the child in her womb. regardless of the mistakes she may have made in her life or the decisions she makes for her future, she is treated with love and respect. i commend and i thank god for the thousands of staff and volunteers at pregnancy resource centers all over this nation. we are a very bright light in the midst of a dark state of affairs. with god's help, we will prevail. [applause] i would like to leave you with a verse from the old testament. it is from genesis chapter 50. it has sustained me and it has given me hope. you intended to harm me, but god intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives in many ways. god bless you all, and thank you. [applause] [chanting u.s.a.] >> nellie, we made it. thank you for your prayers up there. thank you all for being he
properly since the senate was away for the holidays. the department of education telling school districts that they must provide sports for disabled students. much like title ix expanded sports opportunities for girls. those are your news headlines. now, back to lori and melissa. lori: rick, thank you so much. bitter cold temperatures and high wind leaves many people shivering. >> though cold is here for about two to three more days. we are already on day six of this cold. we have not gotten above freezing for about two weeks. a little bit of snow moving to hear. it is not heavy snow, though. maybe one-2 inches. the biggest snowfall will be across the central appellations. the biggest concern, though, will be for some freezing rain. when the ground is called, it is already frozen. freezing rain warnings across parts of kentucky and eastern tennessee. we may see about a half an inch of ice. that could cause some power outages and treacherous conditions on the road. moving forward to the next couple of hours. we will see some of that icing moving through parts of carolina. it will move thro
after a line about education policy. the girls also used their phones to take lots of photos of their family during the event. and at one point malia even photobombed her younger sister. yeah, sisters do that to each other. >>> before leaving the inaugural platform as the center of attention for the very last time, president obama had the presence of mind to stop and take in the moment. >> one more time. i'm not going to see this again. >> great job. ♪ >>> meanwhile, the "today" show's al roker had this unforgettable moment with vice president joe biden while covering the inaugural parade. >> the vice president! mr. vice president! mr. vice president! hey, how you doing? come on! come on! they won't let you? that's it! yeah! all right! yes! yes! >> the persistent al roker. >>> now here's your look at this morning's dish of "scrambled politics." we start with inauguration moments making the rounds. beau biden, the vice president's son, had a very serious expression on his face as he closely watched beyonce's performance of the national anthem. her performance also seemed to
is that they are eventually getting their diplomas. >> a new study from the u.s. department of education finds a national high school graduation rate is at the highest since 1976. >> the study finds the dropout rate for male students was 3.8%. for females, it just under 3%. researchers say the dropout rate was higher among males in every state. >> official said the steady rise of students completing their education is a reflection of the struggling economy that's created greater competition for new jobs. darya. >> thank you a lot more. in national moods, supporters of longtime pen state football coach joe paterno are marking the one-year anniversary of his death with a candlelight vigil. the hall of fame coach died of lung cancer last year at 85. his supporters will hold a vigil at the mural in state college that includes a depiction of paternal. the paternal family is expected to attend. >> organizers say they will like 409 candles, one of each of paternal victories before many were stripped as part of the n.c.a.a. sanctions in response to the jerry sandusky sex abuse scandal. >> today marks the fourth anniv
education and entrepreneurship, i was just lucky. but that helps me so i shouldn't feel ashamed about it, i should leverage it. that just makes sense. it helps being a man in a male-dominated industry or to speak english as a first language. all these things help. they're not enough, but they have to be used in a meaningful way. if we don't realize this, then we leave assets on the table. >> that's interesting. so being a male, it obviously is happening. you're a male in a male dominated industry, but you're saying taking a step back, recognizing that this is an asset actually changes the way you can use it? >> right. because otherwise they may be invisible to us, right? sometimes it takes someone else to realize the things that we already have, but they're hidden in plain sight. so, for instance, i don't think about my gender that much, but if you are a 19-year-old woman who wants to raise money to open up an auto repair shop, people are going to be looking at you, irrespective of what skills, knowledge, experiences you have because they make certain assumptions about you. that doesn't mak
through different ideas, from education, but just right off the bat, the irs has a suggested amount that you can multiply by the number of exemptions and subtract from your income. so also the main thing, gretchen, is that you're filing the right way. married, obviously a couple, married. that's a great way to file. head of household. if you are divorced, it's a little tricky. are you the head of the household for over six months? are you the primary care giver and incurring most of the cost. in which case, this child is your dependent. >> gretchen: so only one much you can claim this. >> right. >> gretchen: tax blessing number two, the child tax credit. what's that? >> so this one, you get $1,000 credit per child. gone are the days that you're passing down the money so freely to the kids. that is taxed so heavily. we know that for a fact. so let's go with this one. get in there and try and get that $1,000 tax credit. there is no forms, nothing. just put in for it. if you have more than one child, orgeat form, the 8812. it will compute that one. this one you could even get a refund
said a democracy can only survive in an educated electorate. if we keep this up we will lose the system we were built upon. finally blaine tweets us considering how bad our government acts if we keep teaching how it should operate, it will only get worse. thank everybody who responded. "fox & friends" starts right now. have a good day. >>alisyn: good morning. today is thursday, january 24. hillary clinton on the hot seat answers questions with more questions. >> the fact is we have four dead americans. was it because of protester because some guys decided to go for a walk. what difference does it make? >>alisyn: you're going to want to hear this. >>steve: you're going to want to see this. that right there is an american plane with an egyptian flag on it leaving yesterday from fort worth, texas. why? we gave did to them. why are we gives weapons to the muslim brotherhood, the people who teach their children to hate the jews? >>brian: we're talking about a gun that guy has concealed now. the new x ray vision police say you won't see, which is good news. ray kelly is working it right now.
our borders to people who have all sorts of education and skills and providing a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million people. that, to me, is one of the first signs that substantively the republican party is taking to heart what you're talking about. >> it's also, though, it's the theatrics of it all, and sarah palin was more theatrics than anything else. doing stupid things and saying stupid things politically, going on facebook after gabby giffords was shot, talking about blood libel, one mistake after another. >> it wasn't just that one line. >> there were, willie geist, so many republicans that really did believe -- and i told them they were dead wrong -- they really believed the benghazi hearings, and i heard this when they were getting sworn in, saying benghazi is going to be the issue where we're really going to get the country to turn on barack obama and hillary clinton. hillary clinton killed them. and once again, a self-inflicted wound. you had a senator going out saying oh, she was just faking her tears. >> oh, my god. >> and we do that time and time and t
the cool ant goes and how they keep that separate from the oil. getting a makerbot is also an education in how things are made in the manufacturing process and in the world around us. >> host: are you the inventer? >> guest: you can blame me. [laughter] where did you come up with the idea? >> guest: you know, 3-d printers have been around for about 25 years, but they were mainframe-size machines that were really expensive. i wanted one. but i couldn't afford one. so some friends and i got together, and we started tinkering. and when it worked, we quit our jobs and started makerbot so everybody could have one of these. >> host: bre pettis is the founder of makerbot and the ceo of the makerbot corporation out of brooklyn, new york, one of the ottest products on -- hottest products here on the floor of ces. [inaudible conversations] >> host: and you've been watching "the communicators" on c-span from las vegas and ces international 2013, the technology show. we will be back next week with more programming from this con convention. >> david maraniss began researching and writing his tenth b
but that is not stopping a teachers grew from hand-picking bill ayers. he will address teacher educators next month in atlanta. ayers was involved in a townhouse bombing in new york city that left three people dead. >>steve: singer james taylor says he knows what gun owners want. >> i think the majority of us feel strongly, even the majority of gun owners feel strongly that we need to make some sacrifice to our freedoms if that's the way to put it. >>brian: is he wearing scalia's hat? >>steve: taylor made the comment after performing at the inauguration. advocates very concerned about the president's proposal on gun control if you take aspirin, it can triple your chances of going blind. those who take it on a regular basis can cause age related macular degeneration. >>gretchen: they tell you to take it for your heart and blood thinning. >>steve: the low dose. >>gretchen: watch this. a huge lighting fixture falls from above landing on the child during a meet in wisconsin. he had just gotten into position to start up the match again when it happened. luckily he only needed a few stitches. no word on
product gear and programming a and education. and our focus is on improving human movement. >> wasn't this created by someone who said you could take it and do it anywhere? >> you can do it anywhere. it was created by a navy s.e.a.l. it's perfect for new york, small spaces. >> what we're going to do first. go ahead and put your right into the left. s sara is a pro. she's been on the suspension trainer before. hands on her shoulders. going to lift yo you are hips. do a couple of remembers of that. then just rest on your knees. lift your lips up. it's core strength all the time. that was great. >> you could hang this at home, eigh right? >> yeah. the new home kit comes with down loadable workouts. it's like having a private trainer when you're at the park, at your house. >> you can make modifications to make it easier or? >> it's for all levels. you're going to come down into a press, keeping your plank, lift your hips, tuck your legs in, good work. >> that's going to leave a mark. >> it's total body. >> thank you so much. that was an awesome workout. >> going to kathy. >> number thre
in educational matters, but in health matters as well. and these gun grabbers are using any excuse to expand the role of government in people's lives and turn parents against their own children and vice-versa, because you have this encouragement among many left wing educators and activists and politicians to encourage children to snitch on their own parents about this issue. >> steve: we're not just talking about going out and getting an illegal gun permit, which most people do. but part of this bill requires parents to notify the school district that they have a gun. >> yes. yes. and the slippery slope here is this is not mirrorly discrimination against law-abiding gun owners who are parents. what it is is viewpoint and political discrimination and political persecution, no doubt about it. >> alisyn: michelle, speaking of schools, let's talk about president obama's plan for public schools in the country. it's called common core. he's setting standards. it's part of the race to the top program. what do we know about common core standards? >> well, a lot of parents and teachers and educators
education and training and a union worker really alleded a lot of value. that hasn't happened so much in recent years and it's become a lot more politicized, and i think that workers are getting sick of that, and they want to be able to have the freedom to do whatever they want to do and understand that this is america, where a job is a privilege and not a right, and i think we'll continue to see that kind of decline unless the union realize they need to add something else to that equation, like training or benefits for members. stuart: i just don't see how you can maintain that level of political clout if you're losing membership and therefore losing union dues revenue, because the political clout is based on the money that comes in from the dues. i'm not sure they can hold that clout, what do you say. well, and not only the money that they have from the dues, but these strong voting base, right? a lot of reason certain favorable to union people get elected in states like illinois, the union have the members that go out and vote and support those candidates. it's not just a money is
of education investigated. notre dame agreed to change its response to sex assaults and is still required to file updates with the government. >> certainly there could be no criminal proceeding after lizzy's death but there could be hope in a place that has a disciplinary process whose mission is to seek truth. >> as the notre dame mission statement says, truth for its own sake. it's important to say that no one has or ever will be criminally charged in any of these cases. to critics and to the seebergs, this is more about accountability. wolf? >> sara, thanks for that. good information for all of our viewers to digest. >>> will the north try to carry them out? stand by. are easy with free pip from the u.s. postal service. we'll even drop off boxes if you need them. visit usps.com pay, print, and have it picked up for free. any time of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ thank you. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we c
the generational cycle of poverty is education, that is the golden ticket out of poverty. and some people just renews to have any responsibility. we keep trying to put it all on our schools or put it all on our teachers. we can't do that. jaime: let me let dr. roberts in who has over seen the process of education in two states, not tennessee. what do you think? >> i think first of all the education arena gives us our title one parenting program, and we need to look at programs that are aligning themselves with the curriculum that are being taught. we all want our parents to help their children, it's a cry for every superintendent in this country. but the question is how do we do this? i would say that we need to look at programs that we had a head start program whereby parent participation was required. we need to look at how we going to require these parents to train them to help their children, because if we can train the parents how to help their children we have demonstrated, parents go on to get ged's, they go on to get better, so that i would say to him, look at the program that is being
. this is renowned author, educator and political activist angela davis who spoke last night, founder of the group critical resistance, a grassroots effort to in the prison industrial complex. davis voiced support for president obama, the said much work needs to be done. >> let me say this time around we cannot subordinate our aspirations and our hopes to presidential the agendas. our passionate support for president barack obama and it is wonderful that we can say for the second time, president barack obama, and we support him and are passionate about that support. but that support should also be expressed in our determination to raise issues that have largely been ignored or not appropriately addressed by the administration. and let me say that we are aware that we should be celebrating, critically celebrating the 150th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. [applause] there should be massive celebrations this year. what has happened other than the film "lincoln"? and of course with 2.5 million people behind bars today, the prison system, the immigrant detention system are terrible remain
about her family and she said her biggest priority, of course, is education. >> college was not an option, it was mandatory. even though we didn't have a lot of money, we made it work. i signed up for financial aid, pell grants, work study, anything i could. and just like our president and first lady, i took out loans to pay for school. i changed oil in a mechanic shop, i flipped burgers at wendy's. i taught aerobics and i worked on campus to pay those loans back. >> cover story, front-page story in the "wall street journal" this weekend talked about how she's becoming a power player here in washington. earlier this weekend i spoke with eva longoria. you must be incredibly excited. you're going to be sitting on the stage on monday watching the swearing in. >> yes. this is my first inauguration. i didn't even watch it last year -- i mean in 2008 because i was working. this is really the first time i'll be experiencing it. >> i know election night you said that you cried and you actually tweeted a picture of your friends celebrating, what do you think you're going to be th
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